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Bob Morris

Bob Morris

Bob Morris is a horticulture expert living in Las Vegas and professor emeritus for the University of Nevada. Visit his blog at xtremehorticulture.blogspot.com. Send questions to Extremehort@aol.com.

Thermometer better than phone app good at predicting freeze

Phone apps are good for predicting a possible freeze, but nothing replaces verification that an actual freeze happened. Maximum/minimum thermometers are a good bench check against your phone app or the National Weather Service predictions.

Plants placed in 2 categories: Mesic and xeric

It is best to think of plants along a continuum (mesic vs. xeric) regarding whether they grow best in dry or wet soil or the type of mulch covering the surface of a landscape soil. So, instead, we group plants into these two categories for convenience.

Thermometer, weather app help to anticipate winter freezes

Plants are not expecting normal low temperatures early or late in the winter season and are not prepared for them. Having a recording maximum/minimum thermometer and having the weather app prepares you for anticipating winter freezes.

THE LATEST
Is vertical farming the answer to feeding the world?

There is some discussion in academic circles whether crops grown in vertical farms aimed at feeding the world should be the higher-value horticultural crops or staple crops like multiple crops of wheat but with 70- to 80-day turnovers.

Chemical application can harm vegetables

The trick to applying chemicals like copper, boron and chlorides is to do it far enough from your raised bed so that the roots from these vegetables won’t be harmed.

Eliminating nonfunctional grass lawns saves water

Nonfunctional lawns aren’t used for anything except beauty or aesthetics in a landscape. The use of grass lawns speaks to a lack of creativity and underappreciation of where we live.

Missing lemons were probably stolen by human

Lemons usually don’t ripen until about December. Ripening means the sugar content increases as they reach maturity. December and January are the usual times we see citrus damaged by vermin.

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