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Las Vegas announces $13M rental aid program

Las Vegas is offering $13 million in rental assistance for low-income households, the city announced on Monday as it also launched a hotline for residents facing eviction.

Eligible city households with incomes at or below 80 percent of the area median income may apply for financial aid through the Rental Assistance for Tenants (RAFT) program. However, the city said that priority will be given to incomes at or below 50 percent of the area median income and/or those who have been unemployed for 90 or more days.

Aid will be provided for up to 18 months and includes help with current and back rent, home energy costs and other housing-related expenses, according to the city. Residents who have not received more than 18 months of financial aid through Clark County’s CARES Housing Assistance Program (CHAP) may also apply for RAFT.

RAFT program applicants must meet other criteria: At least one person living in the household must have faced financial hardship because of the pandemic and must be able to show they are at risk becoming homeless or losing housing. And households must be defined by federal standards as a low-income family.

Las Vegas residents may call the city’s new hotline at 702-229-5935 if they are facing eviction or need help applying for the RAFT program. The line is open 7:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Residents may also send questions about the program to clvrent@lasvegasnevada.gov.

To apply for the RAFT program, visit www.lasvegasnevada.gov/HousingAssistance.

Contact Shea Johnson at sjohnson@reviewjournal.com or 702-383-0272. Follow @Shea_LVRJ on Twitter.

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