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Say this for Nevada: We’re in good shape to survive zombie apocalypse

Updated July 7, 2020 - 4:55 pm

We still haven’t gotten the upper hand on COVID-19.

And in the past week, there have been frightening reports of a new swine flu with pandemic potential as well as bubonic plague, both originating in China.

But should we survive those threats, there’s reason to rejoice: Nevada has been ranked as the ninth-best state in which to survive a zombie apocalypse.

Take that, New Jersey. (As in many a survey, the Garden State pulls up the rear.)

Inside one of those emails that hits your inbox and immediately leads to generous amounts of head scratching, the folks at something called CableTV.com compared each state’s population density, gross farm receipts per capita and the percentage of electricity fueled by solar energy to rank the best locations during said zombie apocalypse.

Nevada came in ninth, between California and Montana, with one caveat: “While you’d want to escape from Los Angeles, the more rural parts of California would be the perfect place to pack up and hunker down. The same goes for Las Vegas; it’s not worth the gamble. Compared to the rest of Nevada’s wide-open deserts, the City of Sin is one you don’t want to be in when the zombies come crawling.”

So there’s that.

Just think how much better we might have fared had the Zombie Apocalypse Store on Spring Mountain Road not converted to a bitcoin seller.

The top 10 states for survivability:

1. North Dakota

2. South Dakota

3. Nebraska

4. Iowa

5. Kansas

6. Idaho

7. Vermont

8. California

9. Nevada

10. Montana

The bottom 10:

50. New Jersey

49. Rhode Island

48. Connecticut

47. Massachusetts

46. Maryland

45. New York

44. Florida

43. Delaware

42. Pennsylvania

41. Ohio

Contact Christopher Lawrence at clawrence@reviewjournal.com or 702-380-4567. Follow @life_onthecouch on Twitter.

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